Man's Search for Meaning

Victor Frankl

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“Those who have a why to live, can bear with almost any how.”


“No man should judge unless he asks himself in absolute honesty whether in a similar situation he might not have done the same.”


“The more one forgets himself—by giving himself to a cause to serve or another person to love—the more human he is and the more he actualizes himself.”


“So live as if you were living already for the second time and as if you had acted the first time as wrongly as you are about to act now!”


“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”


“In some ways suffering ceases to be suffering at the moment it finds a meaning, such as the meaning of a sacrifice.”


“So, let us be alert–alert in a twofold sense.
Since Auschwitz we know what man is capable of.
And since Hiroshima we know what is at stake.”


“Forces beyond your control can take away everything you possess except one thing, your freedom to choose how you will respond to the situation. You cannot control what happens to you in life, but you can always control what you will feel and do about what happens to you. There”


“The second way of finding a meaning in life is by experiencing something—such as goodness, truth and beauty—by experiencing nature and culture or, last but not least, by experiencing another human being in his very uniqueness—by loving him.”


“the meaning of life always changes, but that it never ceases to be. According to logotherapy, we can discover this meaning in life in three different ways: (1) by creating a work or doing a deed; (2) by experiencing something or encountering someone; and (3) by the attitude we take toward unavoidable suffering.”


“For the meaning of life differs from man to man, from day to day and from hour to hour. What matters, therefore, is not the meaning of life in general but rather the specific meaning of a person’s life at a given moment.”


“If there is a meaning in life at all, then there must be a meaning in suffering. Suffering is an ineradicable part of life, even as fate and death. Without suffering and death human life cannot be complete.”


“They died less from lack of food or medicine than from lack of hope, lack of something to live for.”


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